Theatre History 1

  • Final
  • Theatre
  • Theatre History 1
  • 3.0
  • The study of the history of theatre from the Origins of Theatre through the 17th Century. The history and development of theatre and drama are studied in relationship to cultural, political and social conditions of the time. Plays are read for analysis of structure, plot, character and historical relevance.

  • 113
    • Theatrical origins and early traditions. Explanation of methodology and theoretical approach to varying histories. 
    • The classic theatre: Origins of theatrical traditions of Ancient Greek and Roman theatre, analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices. 
    • The Asian theatre: Origins of theatrical traditions of Japan, China, and South Asia, analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices. 
    • The Medieval theatre: Theatrical traditions of Medieval Europe, analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices. 
    • The Renaissance theatre: Theatrical traditions of the Renaissance and early Humanism (including Shakespeare), analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices. Midterm. 
    • The Neo-Classic theatre: Theatrical traditions of seventeenth century France, analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices 
    • The Restoration theatre: Theatrical traditions of seventeenth and eighteenth century England, analysis of texts, development of the theatrical space, cultural development of specific theatrical practices

  • At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • Critique and evaluate the historical, artistic, social and philosophical environments in which theatre exists.
    • Outline the historical development of theatre from the Greeks through the 19th century.
    • Compile evidence illustrating how the relationship between the audience and theatre artist has changed over time.
    • Analyze the role of the theatre arts and its relationship to other parts of society.
    • As a theatre patron analyze and critique dramatic literature and performance
    • Confirm the value and necessity of theatre arts in culture and society
    • Assess the historical relevance, context and importance of different plays.
    • Compare, contrast and analyze the world view presented by the playwrights in each play.
    • Demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills such as listening, reasoning, analysis and criticism when reading or viewing plays.

  • Evaluation methods may include objective examinations (multiple-choice, short answer essay, etc.), written work (such as essays, theatrical critiques and a research paper), and/or a research project with collaborative group work. Assessments and assignments may be administered through an online learning course management system to assess the students’ understanding of the historical development of theatre and ability to analyze the role of the theatre arts and its relationship to other parts of society.

    • Wilson and Goldfarb (2006). Living Theatre, History of the Theatre (8th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill. [ISBN: 0073514128 / 9780073514123]
    • Wilson and Goldfarb (2006). Anthology of Living Theatre (5th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill. [ISBN: 0073514136 / 9780073514130]
    • Klaus, Gilbert and Field (2003). Stages of Drama (5th ed.), Boston:Bedford/St. Martin.
    • Oscar Brockett, History of Theatre, Allen and Bacon
    • Zarrilli, McConachie, Williams, Sorgenfrei, Theatre Histories: An Introduction, Routledge.

  • May 05, 2011